Flooring FAQ's

Flooring FAQ - Haworth

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1.) Why should I install access floor in my existing building?


There's no need to spend extra money to level an uneven subfloor.  Haworth access floor will level it with no additional expense.

By incorporating the raised flooring, power can be placed in the floors rather than the walls for power access in offices. This will speed up installation time, allow for quick power moves and reduce move costs.

 

2.) How does Haworth access floor help reduce the cost of a new building?


- Reduced Overall Height of a Building

Because access floors reduce the overall height of the building, there is savings of the most expensive costs in constructing a new building, the fascade and the structural steel.  

 

- Underfloor air efficiency

Additionally, many businesses have found that operating a building using underfloor air is more cost effective and creates more even temperature management.  

 

- Reduced Construction Lead Time

Using Haworth access flooring, the electrical and data contractors have the benefit of working in almost a complete cold shell when they begin their work. They no longer have to work around all of the other trades. This reduces the installation time, costs, and schedule. When the floor is complete, the warm shell can be completed very quickly.

 

- Reduced need for power in walls and furniture

Haworth’s walls add a lot of inherent flexibility. By incorporating the raised flooring, power can be placed in the floors rather than the walls for power access in offices. This will speed up installation time, allow for quick power moves and reduce move costs.

 

- Adaptability to Change Orders and Future Changes

Utilizing a structured zone cabling and modular zone electrical system (a standard set of cable and wire connections is provided in grid format throughout the floor plate) eliminates the home run approach to cabling and wiring. This power and data infrastructure is also designed up front to maximize density  which normally exceeds that of the initial move in. The result is that there are now plug and play points throughout the floor plate that are easily accessible for connection of power and data as the space is changed and the numbers of occupants increase. This is a sharp contrast to the need for brand new home runs every time a new position is added or one is moved. As a result, the cost to change orders and future adds, moves and changes is significantly reduced.

 

- Clean Space

Because all of the data and power for offices and workstations are under the raised floor, there is no need for power poles and core drilling. This will give a much cleaner aesthetic, avoids the need to continual core drill into the slab and eliminates the need for contractors to come in after move-in to get in the ceiling to install more data or electrical.

 

- Ready-made space for future tenants

Haworth’s Raised Flooring allows building owners to more quickly build out space for future tenants. A prospective tenant can very quickly complete their electrical and data needs in about 25% of the time needed conventionally. It allows for higher ceilings (or open ceilings), and positions the building as a much more technologically advanced space than the competition.

 

- Tax Benefits

Significant financial benefit can be realized when a greater proportion of the construction or acquisition costs qualify for shorter federal tax lives thereby accelerating depreciation deductions. The direct result is increased cash flow that can be used to underwrite current or future capital needs. The movable architectural components that Haworth supplies are not designed to remain permanently in place and, therefore, can be depreciated for tax purposes much more aggressively than fixed-in-place construction. Permanent improvements to non-residential property must be depreciated over the property’s useful life. According to U.S. tax regulation this is currently 39.5 years using the straight-line method. Haworth Walls & TecCrete may be depreciated over 7 years using the double declining balance convention. Technology components can be depreciated over 5 years. Even the carpet tile that is placed on top of the raised flooring can take advantage of this accelerated depreciation. 

 

3.) How does access floor reduce the cost of operating and maintaining a new building? 


Many customers report their energy costs are significantly less with the use of underfloor air managed in a plenum below the Haworth access floor.

In a calibrated study of the New York Times building  in New York city done by the Center for the Built Environment they find a 24% Energy savings with the integrated UFAD design.  (Add a link to the study) http://www.cbe.berkeley.edu/centerline/winter2013.pdf

Larson Binkley Study shows the cost or running a conventional overhead air system versus and underfloor air system in three locations around the country.  Each area shows some cost savings.  See the link…

 

4.) Why are LEED buildings usually built with access floor?

Access floor allows companies to install underfloor air.  Installing air handling systems below the floor actually takes less space than installing it overhead.  This means the overall height of the building can be reduced saving one of the most expensive costs in constructing a new building, the fascade of the building and the structural steel.  Additionally, many businesses have found that operating a building using underfloor air is more cost effective and creates more even temperature management.  

Thornburg Mortgage reports significant waste savings along with energy savings of 47% and an Energy Star rating of 92.  Additionally, they received a LEED Innovation credit earned for waste avoided. Reportedly, their use of moveable walls and underfloor air reduced their churn waste by 97% annually.  


5.) What's the cost of meeting LEED Gold?

A project with Panduit indicated it cost about 2% of the total construction budget to meet LEED Gold criteria.  They expect the payback to be less than 5 years.  

6.) How do you get electrical from a wall to the desktop?  

This is a problem in existing buildings.  You have two choices.  The first choice is to xray the existing floor and then drill through the floor to pull power from another location then run extension cords across the floor or overhead and down poles.  In this case the power location is limited to where it is installed initially.  The second choice is to run modular electrical under access floor to allow electrical outlets wherever they are needed invisibly and if the space needs to be reconfigured the power can be moved.  

 

7.) How much does it cost to core a floor for electrical outlets?  

Rates vary by market. In the Chicago market it costs $1500 per hole to X-ray the floor for a new electrical location.  

 

8.) Why put access floor into a data center?

To allow cooling to the equipment only where it is needed. Using the TecCrete product with airseals you can direct the air only to the airflow panels or grates rather than allowing it to leak into the entire data center.  If directional airflow panels are used the air can be directed into the data cabinets and cool the equipment rather than bypassing the cabinet and cooling the entire room.  

 

9.) Why put underfloor air into a facility?

  • Flexibility

  • Individual temperature control

  • Improved thermal comfort

  • Better air quality

  • Up to 30% less energy usage on an annual basis.

10.) What are the names of previously discontinued Legacy products from Haworth?

The flooring products listed below have been discontinued.  For existing installs or warranty issues, please contact Haworth customer service for further assistance.

TecFlor
Haworth's TecFlor, the steel encapsulated composite core access floor designed for computer rooms, was discontinued in 2007.  If you have a new project requiring access floor please consider the new TecCrete which can be covered in laminate, vinyl, carpeting or left bare.

CreteXL
Haworth’s CreteXL was renamed several years ago to TecCrete.  This product is still available today to be used in offices, data centers, casinos, libraries, higher education, anywhere you would want to install access floor. 

Nexus
Haworth's Nexus low profile access floor was discontinued December 2008.  If you have warranty claims or need to add on to an existing installation please contact customer service.  If you have a new project requiring access floor please consider the new TecCrete which can be covered in laminate, vinyl, carpeting or left bare.

Interface AR & C-TEC
Interface AR was purchased by Haworth in 2004.  The C-TEC product line continues to be available today called TecCrete.  In fact, it has been improved to make it more versatile with additional weight loading options and the ability to be covered in laminate, vinyl, carpeting or left bare.